A woman sits sadly on a bench with a missing place in her chest where her breasts used to be

The Emotional Toll

The experience of a mastectomy can be traumatic and overwhelming, but it is possible to heal emotionally over time. With the support of your loved ones and community, you can work through these feelings and move on with your life.

Emotional healing

The physical healing process after a mastectomy can be long and difficult. But the emotional healing process can be just as challenging. It is important to take the time to mourn the loss of your breast and give yourself permission to grieve.

This may involve talking about your feelings with your friends and family, writing in a journal, or participating in expressive therapies such as art therapy or dance therapy.

It is also important to be gentle with yourself during this time. Try not to overload yourself with too many activities or commitments.

Feeling guilty

If you feel guilty about having a mastectomy, remember that a mastectomy is a major surgery that can significantly impact your life.

Take some time for yourself to relax and recharge. And don't be afraid to ask for help from your loved ones when you need it.

Feeling overwhelmed

If you are feeling overwhelmed or uncertain about your decision, it may be helpful to talk to someone who can offer support and guidance.

There are also many online resources available, such as support groups or forums where you can share your experiences with other women who have been through the same thing.

Feeling sad

If you feel sad about losing your breast, remember that it is normal to feel sad after a mastectomy. Grieving the loss of your breast is part of the healing process.

Talk to your friends and family about how you're feeling. They may be able to offer support and understanding.

Write in a journal about your experiences. This can be a helpful way to express your feelings and work through them over time.

Participate in expressive therapies such as art therapy or dance therapy. These activities can help you process your emotions and come to terms with the loss of your breast.

Feeling inadequate

If you are having difficulty breastfeeding after a mastectomy, remember that it is not your fault if you are unable to breastfeed after a mastectomy. Some women are unable to produce milk after surgery, while others find the experience too painful or uncomfortable.

There are many ways to provide nourishment for your baby without breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor and other mothers about the best options for you and your child.

You are still a mother, no matter how you feed your child. Be proud of the way you are caring for your little one, and know that you are doing an amazing job.

Feeling self-conscious

If you are feeling self-conscious about your appearance after a mastectomy, remember that it is normal to feel self-conscious after surgery. It can take time to adjust to the new way your body looks.

Talk to your friends and family about how you're feeling. They may be able to offer support and understanding. There are many ways to cover up scars from a mastectomy.

You can find clothing or accessories that make you feel comfortable and confident.

Remember that you are still beautiful, no matter what your body looks like. You are still here, and that makes you incredibly strong and amazing.

Feeling angry

If you are feeling angry about having a mastectomy, remember that it is normal to feel angry after surgery. It can be difficult to deal with all of the emotions that come along with a mastectomy.

Talk to your friends and family that have had a similar experience. They may be able to offer support and understanding.

There are many ways to deal with anger after a mastectomy. You can talk to a therapist, participate in anger management classes, or write in a journal about your experiences.

It is important to find ways to express your anger in a healthy way. This will help you cope with the emotions you are feeling and move on from the surgery.

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